Tag Archives: Financial Services

Customer Experience: Playing maturity catch up…

Observations from the Sydney CX Design & Implementation Conference

(11 November – 12 November 2015)

I was lucky to be able to attend the Customer Experience Design & Implementation conference in Sydney last week listening to and speaking with organisations as each shared their experiences, success stories (of course) and learnings (can’t be enough) from organisations covering (but not limited to)  Telco’s, Financial services, Age-care, Government, Recruitment, Logistics, Design, Technology vendors, Fintech and Startups.

It was great to hear the variety of ways organisations make an effort to improve customer experiences across different industries. Such perspective across industries becomes increasingly valuable as many of the experiences people have to one industry drive their expectations and perception of others. As a result, a glass ceiling is put over industries with lower maturity levels in regards to customer experience and related expectations. From my view, which focuses on financial services and wealth management, those industries with lower customer experience maturity levels must play ‘maturity catch up’ versus other more established industries and/or organisations.

In case you are not interested to read further for more detail, buzzwords to summarise the conference include: #Employeeengagement drives customerengagement; #Designthinking; #Listening; #Empathy; #ValueExchange; #Culturalchange; #Differentiateyourexperience; #Multiscreen/#Multidevice; #Rewarddrivescustomerbehaviour; #Customerownsthejourney; #Actionable; #Beingandfeeling; #Voiceofthecustomer; #Nuroscience; Continue reading

The transition from cassette tape to digital music in the wealth management industry

In 1963 Philips founded the cassette tape. It became very popular next to gramophone records and turntables. The cassette tape was one of the first, or THE first, portable music bearing players available to the mass market. These cassettes where suitable  for use with several players (cassette recorder or deck and Walkman) and, until the end of the 90’s, cassette tapes  were actively sold, having hailed a new era of music accessibility.

Over time, Philips again led the way in disruption and founded the Compact Disk (CD) in 1977, which became even more popular and as we know, still exists today. After some years, individuals could even create CDs themselves with music, movies or even documentation (legally or not, but that is not the focus in this case). People seized the opportunity for ownership. The CD then evolved into the less popular minidisk.

Today, we are all familiar with digital music e.g. the MP3, or online music portals like Spotify, ITunes and so on (all not from Philips by the way).

Parallel with the wealth management industry

The wealth management industry is evolving as well, but the transition is not going very smoothly and requires time (it goes slow!). Historically, as I have written in previous blogs already, the wealth management and private banking industry had a niche focus on the rich of this world that wanted to invest to grow their wealth. To make sure the rich were willing to store their funds at a particular bank, the bank went ‘all the way’ to win them as their client. Red carpet, expensive lunches, tickets for whatever event (I know I formulated it a bit short-sighted). And this still exists. But wealth management has developed to be available to ‘all’, not only the super-rich. Also, a (less rich, but still having enough cash) group called “mass affluent” came to be targeted by the banks. And so, this is where we are today as banks are increasingly looking to reach a broader group of (potential) clients (even so, this doesn’t mean that mass affluent clients receive the same treatment, which to some extent is understandable). Continue reading

New Country Other Developments?

amsterdamtosydney

Recently arrived in Sydney (Australia), from Amsterdam (The Netherlands) I would like to continue doing what I did in the past: Sharing thoughts, insights and developments in the Financial Services industry and the Wealth Management industry in particular. Not limited to any geographical boundaries (which boundaries?) with regards to relevance of the subjects of course.

I will only share from personal interest point of view. But feel free to comment or request my view on other subjects as well.

So far so good in Australia. A well developed country, but one of its own kinds. The weather used to be better and the mood to be more relaxed. Is that why some developments are of a view years behind from the place where I grew-up?

Continue reading